1. Topic-
Shakespeare's Sonnets 29 & 130
 
2. Content-
COMMON CORE STANDARDS
READING LITERATURE
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the
text leaves matters uncertain.
2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one
another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
3. Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate
elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how
the characters are introduced and developed).
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is
particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other
authors.)
5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text
(e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or
tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic
impact.
6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly
stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or
understatement).
 
3. Goals: Aims/Outcomes-
Students will understand:
- The implications of Shakespeare's word choice
and structure on a sonnet's meaning.
- The development of an "˜argument' in
Shakespeare's sonnets.
- The connection of Shakespeare's sonnets to
contemporary texts about love, especially love
poems, songs, and greeting cards.


Students will understand:
- The implications of Shakespeare's word choice
and structure on a sonnet's meaning.
- The development of an "˜argument' in
Shakespeare's sonnets.
- The connection of Shakespeare's sonnets to
contemporary texts about love, especially love
poems, songs, and greeting cards.
 
4. Objectives-
Students will be able to:
- Identify elements of a Shakespearean sonnet including rhyme scheme, quatrains, and couplets.
- Interpret Shakespearean sonnets for meaning.
- Evaluate Shakespeare's intent in sonnets 29 and 130.
- Determine if Shakespeare was successful in realizing his intent.
- Make connections between Shakespeare's sonnets and contemporary texts.
 
5. Materials and Aids-
- 10 Hallmark cards about romantic love
- ~100 3x5 notecards
- Think Aloud activity guidelines (1 per group)
- Hallmark Card Comparison guidelines (1 per group)
- white board and markers
 
6. Procedures/Methods-

A. Introduction-

Learning Activities/Instructional Procedures:
- Focusing event (something to get the students' attention): Opening Question
- Which would you rather get from a significant other, a hallmark card or a hand written
love poem? Why?
- Students will have ~3min to write responses on a reflection sheet.
 

B. Development-

- Mini lecture on Shakespearean/English Sonnet form
- ABAB CDCD EFEF GH rhyme scheme
- 3 quatrains and one couplet
- Quatrain = 4 lines
- Couplet = 2 lines
- Rhythm/meter - iambic pentameter
- Heart beat rhythm, soft and hard syllables alternate
- Iamb = a metrical foot one short (unstressed) syllable followed by one
long (stressed syllable.
- Pentameter = a line of verse that contains five metrical feet
- Metrical foot = the unit of syllables that makes up meter in poetry
- Understanding structure can help us follow Shakespeare's train of thought
though his sonnets.
 

C. Practice-

- Think aloud interpretation of Sonnet 29
- Model to students what they will be doing in smaller groups with sonnet 130
- Small Group Work
- Students will work in groups of 4 based on where they are sitting.
- Each member of the group will practice using the Think Aloud technique to
interpret sonnet 130.
- Each member will be responsible for thinking aloud about 1 quatrain or couplet
in the sonnet. The non-speaking members of the group listen, write down
interesting connections or questions they have about what the speaker/thinker is
saying.
Students should use these recorded thoughts guide their analysis of the sonnet
and to address the following questions:
- Why did the author write this sonnet?
- What is the author saying in this sonnet?
- Does the author truly love the person this sonnet is written about?
- Does the author like the person this sonnet is written about?
- Is the author successful in conveying his message? Why or Why not?
 

D. Independent Practice-

- Students will work in groups of 4 based on where they are sitting.
- Each member of the group will practice using the Think Aloud technique to
interpret sonnet 130.
- Each member will be responsible for thinking aloud about 1 quatrain or couplet
in the sonnet. The non-speaking members of the group listen, write down
interesting connections or questions they have about what the speaker/thinker is
saying.
- Students should use these recorded thoughts guide their analysis of the sonnet
and to address the following questions:
- Why did the author write this sonnet?
- What is the author saying in this sonnet?
- Does the author truly love the person this sonnet is written about?
- Does the author like the person this sonnet is written about?
- Is the author successful in conveying his message? Why or Why not?
 

E. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-

- Hallmark Card Comparison
- Each group will be given one hallmark card to compare to Sonnet 130.
- Students should analyze the card as a whole, interpreting text and images.
They can use the following questions to aid in their analysis:
- What is the message of this card?
- What does this card tell the receiver about the giver? (i.e. That the giver
loves them, is thoughtful, lazy, is trying to make up for something, etc."¦)
- Does this card express its message in an original way?
- Does this card rely on cliché©s? If so, which ones?
- Is this card successful in conveying its intended message?
- What other messages could this card send?
 

F. Checking for understanding-

- Compare this card and its message to Shakespeare's sonnet 130
- Which one is better at conveying its message?
- Which one is more original or creative?
- Are there any similarities?
- What differences seem the most important?
- What role does cliché© play in each?
 

G. Closure-

- Closure (how you will end the lesson) Exit Slip
- Which would you rather get on Valentine's Day - Sonnet 130 or a hallmark card? Why?
- Can you think of a love song that is similar to sonnet 130? In what ways is it similar?
- Students can choose which question to answer. They will have 2-3 minutes to
write their response to the question on a 3x5 card that will be turned in as they
leave class.
 
7. Evaluation-
Performance Task(s):
- Think Aloud analysis of Sonnet 130
- Greeting Card Comparison
 

This Lesson Plan is available at (www.teacherjet.com)