1. Topic-
Critical Reading - "And Justice for All"
 
2. Goals: Aims/Outcomes-
1. Students shall become self-directed readers by engaging in literacy experiences relevant to personal interests, goals, everyday life, or world events.
2. Students shall use a variety of strategies to comprehend literary and informational texts.
3. Students shall respond to a variety of texts through writing and extended discussion.
 
3. Objectives-
1. Contribute meaningful responses in collaborative small and whole group settings, building on ideas of others.
2. Students shall engage in thinking critically about contemporary and historical texts and the corresponding social and cultural implications in a global society.
3. Critique historical and contemporary visual media to determine effect on intended audience (e.g., ads, political cartoons, candidate platforms, television and film messages, literary allusions in cartoons)
 
4. Procedures/Methods-

A. Introduction-

1. What is justice? This anthology from the Literature & Thought series contains literature that challenges the reader, promotes critical thinking, and encourages independent exploration of themes and issues related to this topic.

2. The Question of Fairness - Justice Through the Ages - Concept Vocabulary
 

B. Development-

Cluster One: What's Fair"”What's Not?

Thinking Skill: Evaluating

Someone Who Saw (short story)
David Gifaldi
Crossing the Line (article)
Nell Bernstein
Innocent Have I Been Tortured, Innocent Must I Die (letter)
Johannes Junius, with Milton Meltzer
The Law vs. Justice (satire)
Dave Barry
Could a Woman Do That? (essay)
Anita Gustafson
 

C. Practice-

Cluster Two: Who Judges?

Thinking Skill: Analyzing

And Justice for All (article)
Johnny D. Boggs
Shrewd Todie and Lyzer the Miser (Ukrainian folktale)
Isaac Bashevis Singer
justice (poem)
w. r. rodriguez
Words (short story)
Dian Curtis Regan
 

D. Independent Practice-

Cluster Three: Punishment or Mercy?

Thinking Skill: Comparing and Contrasting

The Quality of Mercy (Moroccan folktale)
Sharon Creeden
Portia's Speech (monologue)
William Shakespeare
The Bishop's Candlesticks (drama)
Lewy Olfson, based on Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
This Isn't Kiddy Court (commentary)
Judge Judy Sheindlin
 

E. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-

- Providing multiple assignments within each unit, tailored for students of different levels of achievement.
- Allowing students to choose, with the teacher's guidance, ways to learn and how to demonstrate what they have learned.
- Permitting students to opt out of material they already know and progress at their own pace through new material.
- Structuring class assignments so they require high levels of critical thinking but permit a range of responses.
- Having high expectations for all students.
- Creating learning centers with activities geared to different learning styles, readiness and levels of interest.
- Providing students with opportunities to explore topics in which they have strong interest and find personal meaning.
 

F. Checking for understanding-

1. Shared Inquiryâ„¢ is a discussion method, a teaching and learning environment, and a way for individuals to achieve a more thorough understanding of a text by discussing questions, responses, and insights with fellow readers.

2. Shared Inquiryâ„¢ is a discussion method, a teaching and learning environment, and a way for individuals to achieve a more thorough understanding of a text by discussing questions, responses, and insights with fellow readers.

Shared Inquiry combines a sound theoretical base with proven strategies to engage all readers in higher-order thinking and collaborative problem solving. In Shared Inquiry, participants come together to help each other explore the meaning of a work of literature. Each participant brings a unique perspective that influences how he or she understands the work. Sharing their interpretations, participants gain new insights and deepen or even change their initial understanding. Learn more"¦
Shared Inquiry combines a sound theoretical base with proven strategies to engage all readers in higher-order thinking and collaborative problem solving.
3. In Shared Inquiry, participants come together to help each other explore the meaning of a work of literature. Each participant brings a unique perspective that influences how he or she understands the work. Sharing their interpretations, participants gain new insights and deepen or even change their initial understanding.
 

G. Closure-

Cluster Four: Thinking on Your Own

Thinking Skill: Synthesizing

The United States v. Susan B. Anthony (biography)
Margaret Truman
Dumb Criminal Tales (anecdotes)
Daniel R. Butler et al.
The Truth About Sharks (short story)
Joan Bauer
Martin Luther King, Jr. (poem)
Gwendolyn Brooks
 

This Lesson Plan is available at (www.teacherjet.com)