1. Topic-
Natural Resources
 
2. Content-
Earth
Natural Resource (Air, Rocks, Water, Soil)
Conservation
Recycling
 
3. Goals: Aims/Outcomes-
Students will understand the following:

1. Natural resources come from the earth and can include rocks, soil, water, and air.

2. We can use natural resources to create many useful items we use in our daily lives.

3. Natural resources are important to conserve and use wisely.
 
4. Objectives-
1. Students will learn that the natural world includes rocks, soil, water and gases of the atmosphere.

2. Students will be able to identify uses of natural resources.
 
5. Materials and Aids-
Stopwatch, soda can, piece of chalk, resource cards (I make), classroom objects, colored tokens or counters, overhead projector/whiteboard
 
6. Procedures/Methods-

A. Introduction-

Tell the class, "Today, we'll be looking at some of Earth's resources and trying to figure out a definition for 'natural resource.' "

Have students take a long, deep breath (and exhale.) Ask class "Why do we need to breathe air?" (field answers)

"Now we are going to see who can hold their breath the longest!" (use stop watch to time class)

Ask again, "Why is air important to us? What would happen if we didn't eventually breathe after taking that big breath? What else needs air to survive?"

Hold up soda can and chalk - ask class where these come from? (give guess time. Answer: they come from rocks!)

"What else can we think of that comes from rocks? hmmm"

Tell class that based off this intro with air, chalk, soda cans, and rocks, we are going to come up with a definition for "natural resource."
 

B. Development-

Define the following vocab for the class:

natural resource: items found in nature, such as rocks, soil, water, and air, that are useful to humans.

water: an odorless, colorless, and tasteless liquid that is key to life on Earth

rocks: hard, mineral-rich substances that make up the crust of the Earth

air: a mix of gases, including oxygen, that make up the atmosphere surrounding Earth

conservation: the careful use of natural resources to prevent them from being lost or wasted

(Have visuals on smartboard or overhead projector)
 

C. Practice-

Point out that all of the objects we use in our daily lives are made from the Earth's resources.

Examples can include wood (from air and water), metal (from rocks), plastic (from rocks), glass (from rocks), and neon signs (from air).

Give each student a set of "Resource cards". Students will identify objects in the classroom that are made from rocks, soil, water, or gases. They will use the tape to attach a "resource card" to an object while moving around the room in pairs or threes.

Some examples include chalk and concrete (made from rocks) and cotton and food (from plants grown with the help of soil).

Challenge students to connect the materials an item is made from to the Earth materials they are familiar with.
 

D. Independent Practice-

Focus question for students: How much water do our families use to shower and bathe?

Begin as a class by listing ways that we use water in our daily lives. The students will be discussing in groups the number of showers and baths each of their families take each day. Share the plan with the class about how you will collect and record the data.

Each group will create a tally of the total number of showers and baths their families take every day and they will report this figure to the teacher.
On a whiteboard write the number of gallons for a bath (30) and the number of gallons for a shower (10).

Next, hand out colored tokens to each group and let them know that each token stands for 10 gallons of water.

Each group will make two stacks of tokens, one to represent the total number of gallons of water used by their families for showers and the other for baths.

They will report the total number of gallons for each category to you, who will record it on the class chart and arrive at a class total.

(The class total represents the daily water usage in showers and baths among all the families on any given day. You may also add the totals of your own family to the classroom tally.)

After arriving at the total, ask the class to figure out how much water we can save each day by only taking showers. Discuss how to arrive at a solution, using tokens or cubes if necessary. If no family takes a bath, discuss other ways to conserve water, including taking shorter showers or using a low-flow shower head.
 

E. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-

1. Students will be given manipulatives to assist with the math portion of the independent practice
2. I will circulate the room to provide one-on-one help if needed.
3. Directions will also be written on the board, as well as provided verbally.
 

F. Checking for understanding-

They will report the total number of gallons for each category to you, who will record it on the class chart and arrive at a class total.

After arriving at the total, ask the class to figure out how much water we can save each day by only taking showers. Discuss how to arrive at a solution, using tokens or cubes if necessary. If no family takes a bath, discuss other ways to conserve water (including taking shorter showers or using a low-flow shower head.)
 

G. Closure-

"So what we have been able to learn today is that natural resources are very important to many parts of life.

It is our job as humans to do our best to keep them safe - kinda like Earth superheroes. When we see an opportunity to recycle or reuse something, we need to take it!"
 
7. Evaluation-
On an exit card (premade by me), have the following questions:

1. What is a "natural" resource"?
2. Name 2, 3, or 4 natural resources we learned about today
3. Why is it important to protect natural resources?

(collect after allotted time)
 

This Lesson Plan is available at (www.teacherjet.com)